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Horrible Hauntings

This exciting book brings to life—quite literally—ten famous hauntings from the annals of history. By downloading a free app and using your smartphone or tablet to view each luscious illustration, you can summon... More Info

Cleopatra "Serpent of the Nile"

The richest, most powerful woman in the world, Cleopatra ruled the East and tamed the West. Many believed she was as sly as a serpent. Or was she just smart? More Info

Agrippina "Atrocious and Ferocious"

Ambitious Roman empress Agrippina murdered and married her way to the throne—and to being declared a goddess. She made many enemies, including her own son. But was she really that atrocious? More Info

Mary Tudor "Bloody Mary"

The Queen of England, Mary Tudor burned hundreds of Protestant at the stake. Was she just a ruler of her times, or did she deserve the name "Bloody Mary?" More Info

Catherine de' Medici "The Black Queen"

Queen of France, Catherine de’ Medici would do anything to keep her family in power, including using poison and black magic—earning her the name, "The Black Queen." But was she really that dastardly? More Info

Njinga “The Warrior Queen”

Njinga, "The Warrior Queen," fought fiercely to keep her people from slavery. Yet she engaged in atrocities herself…Was she a terrifying tyrant or a freedom fighter? More Info

Marie Antoinette "Madame Deficit"

This young, pretty queen is remembered for supposedly uttering, “Let them eat cake,” and spending money while her people starved. But was Marie Antoinette as heartless as everyone believed? More Info

Cixi "The Dragon Empress"

The last empress of China, Cixi lived cloistered inside her lavish Forbidden City, ignoring the needs of her people. But was "The Dragon Empress" evil or just out-of-touch? More Info

Hatshepsut of Egypt

When explorers first shined a light into Tutankhamun’s tomb, everything it touched glinted with gold and gleamed with silver. But it was a less-famous princess who accumulated a lot of the wealth buried in that tomb. Her name was Hatshepsut. More Info

Artemisia of Caria

Thousands of years ago, in the world of the Ancient Greeks where women were not expected to be seen, this princess prompted the Persian Great King, Xerxes, to declare, “My men have become women, and my women men!” More Info

Sorghaghtani of Mongolia

On the wind-swept steppes of Mongolia in the 13th century, a princess was given the chance to rule. She took lands that had been ruined by war and made them wealthy again...and won her sons the largest empire in the world. More Info

Qutlugh Terkan Khatun of Kirman

In what could be a tale from the Arabian Nights, a girl grows up in 13th-century Persia to be so desirable that she is kidnapped several times for her beauty, ends up ruling a nation, and is now remembered above all for her kindness and compassion. More Info

Isabella of Castile

In a twist on the classic fairy tale, a princess in 15th-century Spain refused to wait for a prince but instead chose one for herself. The partnership that she made with her prince was a happy one. Without Isabella and Ferdinand, both Spain and America would not exist now as we know them. More Info

Nur Jahan of India

From the deepest heart of the Moghul palace, tucked away in purdah with her face hidden by veils, one princess came to rule all of Mogul India—and do many other things that girls were not expected to do. More Info

Sacajawea of the Shoshone

One minute she was picking berries. The next, Sacajawea was scooped up and taken far away from her village and family—and into history. In her short life, Sacajawea would travel farther than any American woman of her time. More Info

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